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Full text of "The Tattler"

THE TATTLER 



1950 




THE TATTLER 



WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 



1950 




Dedical 



ion 



To Mr. Branch our friend and confidant, the class of 
1950 gratefully dedicates this issue of the Tattler. 



THE TATTLER 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Editor-in-Chiei Reta Ice 

Assistant Editor Murilyn Grades 

Business Manager Warren McAvoy 

Assistants .... Robert Liimatainen, Edward Marritt 

Allen Warner, Marion Johnson 

Literary Editor Anne Sabo 

Assistant Jean Ellen Harlow 

Alumni Editor Jane Smith 

Sports Editor Philip Morin 

Assistant Marilyn Black 

Exchange Editor Elaine Outhuse 

Assistant Anna Mae Sincage 

Faculty Advisors . . Maria Lovechio, Frances Grinnell 



CONTENTS 



Dedication 

Senior Class Pictures 
Class History 
Class Will . . 

Class Prophecy 



2 
4 

11 
13 
14 



Prophecy on the Prophetess U 



Class Grinds — Girls . 
Class Grinds — Boys . 
Class Statistics 
Seniorscope .... 
Class of '51 

Class of '52 .... 
Class of '53 .... 
Literary and Editorials 
Alumni Notes .... 
Tattler .... 

Atomic Staff 

Forensic .... 

Orchestra .... 

Glee Club .... 

Chorus .... 

Everybody's Getting Married 
Pro Merito .... 

Boys' Basketball 
Cheer Leaders 
Girls' Basketball 
Autographs .... 

Advertisements 



18 
19 
20 
20 
22 
23 
24 
25 
29 
31 
31 
32 
33 
33 
34 
34 
35 
36 
36 
37 
38 
39 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 





DONALD H. BALDWIN 

"He's a wonderful talker, who has the art of 
telling you nothing in a great harangue." 

Glee Club 1; Baseball 1, 3; Basketball 3; 
Christmas Ball Committee 3; Prom Com- 
mittee 3; Class Play 4; School Paper Staff 4. 

Downright devilish 
Hardly a scholar 
Boisterous 



LUCY BARNAS 

"Sober, steadfast and demure." 

Glee Club 1; Prom Committee 3; Class 
Play Committee 4. 

Likeable and quiet 
Bashful with boys 




THE TATTLER 



JOYCE M. COLSON 

"Marriage is a thing you've got to give 
your whole mind to." 

Chorus 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Christmas 
Ball 3; Prom Committee 3; School Paper 3, 
4; Freshman Reception 4; Class Play Com- 
mittee 4. 

Jolly manner 
Marvelous personality 
"Cute" 





ANNE B. GATES 

"Her voice was ever soft, gentle, and low, 
an excellent thing in woman." 

Glee Club 4; Chorus 4; School Paper Staff; 
Class Play Committee 4. 

Amiable, but shy 
Bashful scholar 
Gentle and quiet 



RET A M. ICE 

"Believe me triend Hollaballoo! The greatest 
events are not our noisiest, but our 
stillest hours." 

Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Cheer 
Leader 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Historian 1, 4; Foren- 
sic League 3; Girl's Basketball 3; Christmas 
Ball 3; Prom Committee 3; Class President 
3; School Paper 3, 4; "Tattler" Staff 3, 4; 
Class Play 4. 

Rather sarcastic 
Mind of her own 
Ideal classmate 




::w ' : s ~:? : 



lllllliM 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




MARION E. JOHNSON 

"In thy face I see the map of honor, 
truih and loyalty." 

Glee Club 1,2 3, 4; School Paper Staff 1, 4; 
Class Vice-President 2, 3; Christmas Ball 3; 
Prom Committee 3; Chorus 3, 4; Pro Merito 
3, 4; "Tattler" Staff 4; D.A.R. Good Citizen 
4; Class Play 4. 

Mischievous smile 
Easy to like 
Jokes a lot 



ROBERT L. LIIMATAINEN 

"Men of lew words are the best men." 

Glee Club 1, 3; Christmas Ball Committee 
3; Prom Committee 3; Chorus 4; Freshman 
Reception 4; "Tattler" Staff 4; Class Play 4. 

Reliable student 
Likely to succeed 
Lover of sports 





SHIRLEY E. MAGDALENSKI 

"She's sudden if a thing comes in her head." 

Forensic League 1; Cheerleader 1; Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; School Paper Staff 2, 3, 4; 
Christmas Ball 3; Prom Committee 3; Class 
Play 4. 

Seldom serious 

Energetic fatalist 

Man's only worry other than the H bomb 



THE TATTLER 



WARREN O. McAVOY 

"Men must endure his going hence, 
even as his coming hither." 

Chorus 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Baseball 
3; Christmas Ball 3; Prom Committee 3; 
"Tattler" Staff; Class Play 4. 

Wonderful photographer 
One of the best 
Manly and well dressed 





ROBERT C. McCORD 

"You may relish him more in the soldier 
than in the scholar." 

Basketball 1, 2, 3; Prom Committee 3; 
Christmas Ball 3; Class Play Committee 4. 

Really nice looking 
Cautiously wolfish 
Master of wit 



JOYCE M. MORIN 

"Do you not know 1 am a woman? When 
1 think, 1 must speak." 

Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Cheer- 
leader 1, 2, 3; Class Historian 3; Christmas 
Ball; Prom Committee 3; School Paper Staff 
3, 4; Class Play 4. 

John's other life 

Much ado about nothing 

Man's best friend 




WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




PHILIP V. MORIN 

"Idleness is an appendix to nobility." 

Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball L, 2, 3, 4; 

School Paper Staff 2, 3, 4; Christmas Ball 

3; Prom Committee 3; Tattler Staff 4; Class 
Play 4. 

Popular sportsman 

Vitalis fan 

Makes girls swoon 



ELAINE OUTHUSE 

"Everyone thinks his sack heaviest." 

Forensic League 1; Chorus 2, 3, 4; School 
paper staff 2, 3, 4; Christmas Ball Committee 
3; Prom Committee 3; Glee Club 3, 4; Pro 
Merito 3, 4; "Tattler" Staff 4; Class Treasurer 
4; Class Play 4. 

Everybody's friend 
Original in Art 





-X 




EARL E. RICHARDSON 

"He is a little chimney, and heated hot 
in a moment." 

Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; 
Christmas Ball 3; Prom Committee 3; Class 
Play Committee 4. 

Enthusiastic sports fan 
Eager beaver 
Really full of fun 



THE TATTLER 



KATHLEEN ANNE SABO 

"Will and Intellect are one and the 
same thing." 

Class President 1; Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee 
Club 1, 4; Forensic League 1, 2, 3, 4; Class 
Secretary 2; American Legion Oratorical 
Contest and Medal 2; Elks' Essay School 
Award 2, 3; Class Treasurer 3; N.F.L. De- 
gree of Excellence 3; United Nations Con- 
test — Certificate of Distinction 3; Elks' Dis- 
trict Award 3; Prom Committee 3; Pro Mer- 
ito 3, 4; School Paper Staff 2, 3, 4; 'Tattler" 
Staff 3, 4; Class Play 4. 

Keen sense of humor 
Apparently a red-head 
Successful in her undertakings 





ROBERT B. SHARPE 

"A lew strong instincts and a lew- 
plain wiles." 

Chorus 1; Christmas Ball 3; Junior Prom 3; 
Class Play Committee 4. 

Ready for anything 
Beginner at the end 
Slyly shy 



ANNA MAE SINCAGE 

"As good be out oi the vsorld 
as out of fashion." 

Class Historian 1; Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Cheer Leader 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 2; School Paper Staff 2, 3, 4; 
Christmas Ball Committee 3; Prom Com- 
mittee 3; "Tattler" Staff 3, 4; Class Play 4; 
Class Secretary 4. 

Animated conversationalist 
Marry Harvey? 
Sort of sweet 




10 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




ALLEN O. WARNER 

"So much one man can do 
That does both act and know." 

Forensic League 1; Glee Club 1, 3; Baseball 

2, 3, 4; Christmas Ball 3; School Paper Staff 

3, 4; Pro Merito 3, 4; Prom Committee 3; 
Class President 2, 4; "Tattler" Staff 4; Class 
Play 4. 

Artful antagonist 
Outstanding student 
Wolf by brotherly instinct 



CHARLES W. WARNER 

"His words, replete with guile, into her 
heart easy entrance won." 

Baseball 1, 2, 3; Prom Committee 3; Fresh- 
man Reception 4; Class Play 4. 

Carefree and devil-may-care 
Wanton with affection 
Wolf by profession 




i iA 




HENRY J. WARNER 

"Woe be to him who reads but one book." 

Baseball 1, 2, 3; Treasurer 2; Christmas 
Ball Committee 3; Prom Committee 3; 
School Paper Staff 4; Class Play 4. 

Happy-go-lucky 
Just a swell guy 
Wolf by nature 



THE TATTLER 



11 



C/ass J-lisJory 0/ 7950 



Our class had always been known 
for its ambitious students — not for 
studying, but for traveling — and that is 
why on September 4, 1946, a group of 
thirty-six travelers landed on the planet 
of Mars. How did we get there? We 
flew! How did we get out of the pow- 
er of gravity from earth? — Well, that 
news is not yet ready for publication! 
All I know is that on the morning of 
June 16, 1946, it had been predicted 
that our group would proceed into an 
unknown world, a place that had never 
been inhabited by creatures of our par- 
ticular kind or size or ambition, and 
that when we learned that our destina- 
tion was Mars, we couldn't wait for 
September when we would begin our 
exploration. 

For many of us who had never been 
any farther than Boston or New York, 
what a journey! The suspense and ex- 
citement of leaving LaGuardia Air- 
port, in New York, in August, was 
really more than most of us could en- 
dure, because we didn't know what 
lay ahead of us. Six rocket ships had 
been reserved for us, and had all the 
accommodations of a modern home. 
We were quite excited and watched 
the air field become smaller and small- 
er as we flew away. Many of us had 
tears in our eyes, for we did not know 
when we would return to the good 
Earth. By the time we had traveled 
700 miles, we began to feel the force 
of gravity which kept pulling us back 
and saying: "Come back, you don't 
know what you're in for, come back!" 
We could feel that we were being 
pulled, and also could hear the warn- 
ing, but between our stubbornness and 
the motors of the rockets, we continued 
on. Oh, what a memorable feeling as 
we soon came in sight of the planet! 
We had traveled 57,000,000 miles and 
arrived at our destination on Septem- 
ber 4, 1946, in the little town of 
Williamsburg, Mars. 

From then on it was a life that should 
be experienced by many others. Hav- 



ing very little oxygen and water, we 
became dwarfs and were the Men and 
Women of Mars. Our chief guide, who 
was also Queen of the "little people," 
was Queen Anne Dunphy, and her as- 
sistant guide for that year was Sir Ed- 
ward Foster. They both informed us 
that our task while there would be to 
acquire all the knowledge possible 
about our surroundings in order to 
then pass on this store of information to 
others. Of course, in any new place, 
the work for a few days is easy, but 
after becoming acquainted with our 
fellow men and chief advisors, the ad- 
visors began giving large assignments 
which many found quite difficult to do. 
Some even began to talk of leaving 
Mars, and returning to Earth for Free- 
dom, and a world of fresh air. Instead 
a committee was elected to see what 
they could do about the tremendous 
problem. Anne Sabo was elected pres- 
ident, with four assistants to keep a 
general record of the proceedings. 
Dorrance Bates was elected vice-presi- 
dent; Charles Mollison, secretary; Nor- 
man Bates, treasurer; and Reta Ice, his- 
torian. Their investigation revealed 
that the average stay of exploration 
parties on Mars was four years. But 
very little progress was made so that 
on the evening of October 6, 1946, most 
of us thought that we were about to 
meet our doom at a reception planned 
to test our endurance. We there be- 
came acquainted with the general stu- 
dent body of Mars who had all had the 
same futile hope of escape as we. 
They, however, were nearing their 
goal. What we had gotten ourselves 
into, we really didn't know. How long 
we were to stay was up to most of us 
to decide. 

Before two months had passed, an- 
other "man" from Earth decided to join 
us, and while the rocket was still on 
Mars, two of our friends left. They just 
couldn't stand being away from home 
any longer. Our guide, Sir Foster, was 
very good to us and gave us an inter- 
esting trip. We even thought he might 



12 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



show us a way to escape, but it was a 
useless hope because he was under the 
jurisdiction of Queen Dunphy, and no 
one ever dared do anything against 
her wishes for fear of receiving the 
worst punishment ever contrived: stay- 
ing after school for fifteen minutes for 
each minute wasted in school, and 
there were many who had other uses 
for their afternoons. Oh, dear, what a 
life! 

Regardless of what our committee 
tried to do for us, everything proved 
useless. One by one a "little man" 
would plead to return home, so that 
by June 24, 1947, three had left, and 
approximately three more left between 
June and October of 1947. How bad 
we felt to see our friends leave, and 
how lonely we were for the friends on 
Earth and the fresh air and water! We 
had spent one year on Mars and still 
the most had yet to be accomplished. 
We had to make the acquaintance of 
our new guide, Sir Raymond William- 
son. What a faithful person and friend! 
It was through him that we learned that 
a person of average intelligence could 
leave the planet at the end of four 
years' exploration with a little knowl- 
edge of his surroundings, so a great 
many decided to take advantage of this 
opportunity to see if he was telling the 
truth. But some thought they could 
leave in a shorter time, and so they ap- 
pointed another committee to see if this 
one could do any better than the one 
the year before. Allan Warner was 
chosen president; Marion Johnson, vice- 
president; Anne Sabo, secretary; Henry 
Warner, treasurer; and Anna Mae Sin- 
cage, historian. But even that group 
proved useless. By the summer of 1948, 
five had decided to leave us forever. 
They had the idea that they had al- 
ready acquired sufficient information 
for their purposes. 

In the fall of 1948, twenty-two report- 



ed for the first day of classes. Again 
we had to make the acquaintance of 
another guide, Sir Robert Branch. Be- 
fore two weeks had elapsed, another 
thought that the money earned on 
earth was more important than the 
learning obtained on Mars, and left us. 
A committee again was elected to see 
what they could do with the problem. 
Reta Ice was elected president; Marion 
Johnson, vice-president; Robert Liima- 
tainen, secretary; and Anne Sabo, 
treasurer. During this year we had the 
privilege of putting on two activities by 
which to earn money for the required 
expedition into the most mysterious and 
treacherous parts of Mars, to take place 
the last year of our stay. Our treasury 
gradually grew, but not fast enough to 
satisfy our demands. One more year 
had gone with just one left. 

On September 7, 1949, twenty report- 
ed for their first class in their last year. 
We had to make the acquaintance of a 
new guide, Lady Maria Lovechio. An- 
other member was added to our group, 
but one left, one who had been our 
most cheerful companion for three 
years. We still had twenty students, 
but what was quite unusual, ten men 
and ten women. Never had there been 
a group like ours. Again a committee 
was elected to decide the best way to 
help us escape from the planet. The 
persons chosen were Allan Warner, 
president; Robert Liimatainen, vice- 
president; Anna Mae Sincage, secre- 
tary; Elaine Outhuse, treasurer. 

We all knew that back on Earth our 
parents were eagerly waiting for our 
arrival on June 23. But before returning 
home, we had to undertake a journey 
to the most remote region of Mars. In 
order to finance such an expedition, a 
play, "Everybody's Getting Married," a 
title that fit our class perfectly, was pro- 
duced. At last the day arrived for our 
first public appearance. What a thrill- 
ing, and wonderful experience for all, 



THE TATTLER 



13 



and a most successful play. At last we 
had the right amount of money for our 
trip. 

On April 17, 1950, eighteen members 
of the class and their chaperons left for 
the further end of "Nowhere". Here we 
enjoyed the attractions and overcame 
the hazards met by any traveler. 
But as all things start, they must also 
come to an end, so that on April 20, we 
returned to civilized Mars to complete 
our last ten weeks of the four-year 
course. Those weeks went by so quick- 
ly! No one can actually realize how we 
felt when on June 22 an announcement 
was made that the twenty who had sur- 
vived the training period could return 
to Earth on the following day. On the 
evening of June 22, each one was pre- 
sented a paper allowing him to return 
home. To receive those papers, our di- 



plomas, had been our chief ambition 
during those four years. 

On Friday morning, June 23, three 
rocket ships were waiting for us, just 
one-half the number that brought us 
up. We departed with joy, and a little 
sorrow in our hearts, because we 
would never be able to share the same 
experiences again. We boarded the 
ships and flew back to Earth, and when 
we were 700 miles from our landing 
destination, we once again came into 
contact with gravity which pulled at us 
like an elastic, and p-1-i-n-g we were 
home again. Stepping from the ship, 
we drew in our first breath of fresh 
air, and again became normal people, 
for there before our eyes was the mat: 

"Welcome Home" 

MARION JOHNSON 



Class TUill 



We, the class of 1950, having accu- 
mulated various valuable items and 
abilities during the past four years 
which must now be disposed of, here- 
by sign, seal, and deliver this docu- 
ment as our last will and testament on 
this, the twenty-first day of June, 1950. 
To everyone with whom we have been 
associated we leave our thanks for 
their help and encouragement during 
the times when it was most needed. 

To Miss Dunphy we leave the pic- 
tures of the New York trip (if she can 
get them). 

To Mr. Merritt we leave a fire-extin- 
guisher to put out various bonfires oc- 
curring near his office. 

To Mr. Foster we leave the fond 
memories of all the hard work done 
by this class in his courses. 

To Mr. Branch we leave Venetian 
blinds for all his windows so he can 
get plenty of light without the sun shin- 
ing in. 

To Mrs. Grinnell we leave a set of 
ear plugs so she won't be bothered by 
her classes when she comes in late. 



To Mr. Tonet we leave a case of 
Wheaties to distribute among his vari- 
ous teams so that they will win some 
games. 

To Miss Lovechio we leave a cushion 
to put on her chair so that she will 
be able to see her students over the 
f op of her desk. 

To Mae we leave a private office so 
she won't be bothered by Mr. Merritt 
and Miss Dunphy. 

To Merrill we leave the cooperation 
we gave Vernon in leaving the rooms 
messy so that he would have some- 
thing to do. 

Charles Warner leaves his shyness 
when girls are around to Richard 
Houghton. 

Allen Warner leaves his ability to 
make it look as if he is doing something 
when he really isn't to Normie Tiley 
who could use this trait. 

Henry Warner leaves his ways with 
Freshmen girls to Burkie Ray who can 
use them next year. 



14 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Philip Morin leaves his habit of 
chewing gum constantly and getting 
away with it to Aaron Brown. 

Donald Baldwin and Shirley Magda- 
lenski leave their acting talent to two 
juniors who may need it next year 
when they have a play. Shirley also 
leaves her hatred of men to Jean Ellen 
Harlow. 

Anne Sabo leaves her ability for al- 
ways getting her picture taken at the 
wrong moment to Murilyn Graves. 

Anna Mae Sincage leaves her un- 
ceasing chattering to anyone in actual 
need of it. 

Marion Johnson leaves her quiet 
ways to Henry Bisbee as he could use 
a few of them. 

Earl Richardson leaves his prowess 
as an athlete to Frank Smith who al- 
ready has a good start. 

Robert Liimatainen leaves his love of 
the New York Yankees to Gilbert 
Sears. 

Reta Ice leaves her constant giggling 
to Betty Hathaway. 

Joyce Colson leaves her ability to 
catch her man to Ellen Jean Bancroft. 



Anne Gates leaves her shyness to 
Shirley Hathaway. She thinks she 
could use some. 

Bobby McCord leaves his shadow to 
the junior girls as they seem to swoon 
every time he is around. 

Robert Sharpe leaves a '42 Chrysler 
to one of the junior boys so they will 
be able to use it after play rehearsals. 

Lucy Barnas leaves her quiet ways 
to Lucia Penfield. 

Joyce Morin leaves her flirtatious 
ways to Patty Culver to add to those 
that she already has. 

Warren McAvoy leaves his camera 
to anyone who can operate it with the 
hope that they get as many chances 
to use it as he did. 

We, the senior class, leave the jun- 
iors the fun we had after play rehear- 
sals and hope they have as many won- 
derful experiences in their senior year 
as we did. 

Witnessed by 
a 1942 Chrysler 
a 35 MM camera 

and 
ALLEN OSCAR WARNER, 
President of the Class of 1950 

WARREN O. McAVOY 



C/3SS Prooh 



Last week, June 22, 1970, I came 
back from my long awaited vacation 
trip to the mountains. I came back 
with an odd tale lingering in my mem- 
ory. Let me tell you what happened. 
On a bright sunny day I set out from 
the mountain lodge alone. I was off 
to explore the giant mountain off to 
the east. It was a long and tedious 
trip and by the time I reached the half 
way point I sat down to rest. It was 

then I noticed a cave in one of the 
giant rocks. "Curiosity killed the cat," 
I thought, but pushed aside the brush 
half concealing the entrance and went 

inside. As all good hikers do, I carried 
a flashlight, much needed at the mo- 
ment, for before I had gone far into 
the mouth of the cave, the light from 
the outside was gone. I followed the 



ropnecy 

tunnel far and long and presently 
came to a flight of stairs. The rest of 
the journey was all down flights of 
stairs. Upon reaching the foot of the 
stairs, I saw a large door in front of 
me. It was ajar so I peeked in. There 
before my eyes was another world! 
Stores, houses, factories, hospitals, and 
even schools! It was a perfect model 
of the world from which I had just 
come. I went inside and began to 
walk down the street. So many of the 
faces of the passing people were famil- 
iar. After inquiries I learned that this 
whole little world was inhabited only 
by those persons who had graduated 
from Williamsburg High School. Again 
curiosity got the best of me and I 
asked where I could find my class- 
mates from the class of 1950. I was 
directed to the circus grounds. 



THE TATTLER 



15 



Strolling around the grounds, I no- 
ticed a huge crowd gathered around 
the "Ring the Bell, Test your Strength, 
and Win a Cigar" booth. I finally 
pushed my way through the mob and 
what I saw made me double up with 
laughter. The 50-foot post with the 
bell on top had broken and there was 
Anne Sabo, my old chum, substituting 
for it so the "show could go on." The 
weight struck her chin and made a 
bell ringing sound with such clearness 
and quality of tone that I knew that 
the brain of our class had at long last 
found a worthwhile occupation. 

The next house I noticed was the 
"Unusual Occupations" one. I went 
inside and immediately noticed a little 
room with a big sign on the door. It 
read, "Are you tired, worn out, run 
down, from rubbing yourself dry with 
one of those great big towels after 
baths? We have the perfect and only 
solution!!" My inquisitive nature led 
me in. The room contained a bathtub. 
On the wall were two signs about a 
foot apart. One said "Breathe Here"; 
the other, "Turn switch here." Then 
who should come up and slap me on 
the back but Allen Warner. This, he 
explained, was the result of a life time 
devoted to inventing. "Instead of over- 
working by drying yourself with a 
heavy towel, you breathe into this 
little hole before you get into the tub. 
When you step out, you turn the 
switch, and out through this little hole 
comes the hot air you breathed into 
the hole before. Hesto-Presto — you are 
dry." This I thought, was so typical of 

Allen — always after an easier way of 
getting things done. He had been a 
great speaker as president of our class 
— I imagine that's where he formed the 
"hot-air" idea. 

I decided it was time I got a little 
exercise. I asked the policeman where 
I might find a booth where you pitch 
three balls for a dime. When I got 
there, I paid the man the dime, took 
one of the balls in my hand, and 
waited until the head came poking 



through the hole in the canvas. As 
soon as what appeared to be a head 
came in sight I threw the ball, and 
hit it right on 'the nose. To my amaze- 
ment he yelled, "Hey, Outhuse, what's 
the big idea?" At a closer look I 
noticed that in spite of two black 
eyes and an enlarged nose, Donald 
Baldwin had not changed a bit. Ducky 
never had been able to duck the eras- 
ers in the class-room, so I was sur- 
prised that he choose a career such as 
this. 

I then noticed a huge crowd gath- 
ered around a boxing ring. As I came 
nearer, I could make out the barker's 
words — "Who can stay in the ring 
sixty seconds with the 'Red Beetle'? 
$10,000 to each and every one who 
can!!!" Then he stepped aside and be- 
hind him was the "Red Beetle", none 
other than Earl Richardson. He was 
now the world champion wrestler. It 
brought to mind the day in school 
when he had had a box of Wheaties 
in his desk — I guess they brought re- 
sults. 

Next I went into the lion's den so 
to speak. There were all kinds of 
lions and tigers and other members of 
the cat family, in cages all up and 
down the sides of 'the den. According 
to the schedule it was almost time for 
the show to start and I decided it 
would be very interesting to observe. 
But at that moment a bell rang and 
all the cage doors automatically flew 
open and every cat in the place sprang 
toward me. Only then did I realize 
that I shouldn't be in there. Those 
wild, growling, ferocious cats were 
pushing toward me. Then, all at once 
'they stopped in their tracks and lay 
down upon the floor with innocent 
looks on their faces. From behind 
came a voice — -"Don't be afraid now. 
They're under control." I turned 
around and there was Bobby Liima- 
tainen. He was the owner and trainer 
of all these animals. He then gave me 
exciting accounts of his perilous jour- 
neys into darkest Africa in search of 



16 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



these wild beasts. I remembered his 
pet like had always been sports. 

Joyce Colson was the next person I 
met. She had a house right on the cir- 
cus grounds and I went to see her 
"little" family. She had married soon 
after graduation as she had planned. 
However, she was not too well off and 
was forced to enter her three sets of 
quintuplets in the life of the circus. 
The first five were all beautiful blonde 
girls like their mother and were run- 
ning a dance hall to support her. The 
other ten children were all boys — she 
always had a fancy for the male of the 
species — and were performing various 
jobs around the circus. 

From behind one of the wagons I 
heard someone shouting and speaking 
in a very forceful way. I investigated 
and found that the source of this noise 
was the medicine-woman, Lucy Banas. 
She had become a saleswoman for a 
medicine company and was trying to 
sell "Broken Toenail Conditioner". 
What a change from the quiet and shy 
girl I knew back in high school! 

It was now time for the show inside 
the big main tent. Once inside I man- 
aged to get a ringside seat. Onto the 
circular platform danced a big, white 
charger, beautifully arrayed in glitter- 
ing jewels. Upon his back was one of 
the most graceful bareback dancers I 
had ever seen. Around and around 
they went, the dancer doing quick little 
ballet steps up and down the horse's 
back. But, suddenly the horse knelt 
down and the cute little dancer was 
thrown to the ground. I couldn't be- 
lieve my eyes for despite the disguise 
I recognized Henry Warner. His wig 
and false eyelashes had fallen off in 
the tumble. It reminded me of the time 
in New York when he had done a 
dance for us wearing Reta's housecoat. 

Then, as Henry picked himself off 
the floor, the music switched to "He 
floats through the air with the great- 
est of ease, the daring young man on 
the flying trapeze." I looked to the top 
of the tent and there was Warren Mc- 
Avoy, swinging gracefully by his toes. 



That in itself was utterly amazing as 
he had always dreaded high places, 
but on top of that he was taking flash- 
bulb pictures of the audience. Even in 
high school he was clever about get- 
ting unusual shots of unsuspecting 
people. But the difference was — 
whereas he used to sell them for a 
dime apiece, he was now selling them 
for $100.00 apiece. "Quite a living!" 
quoth Mackie as he flew through the 
air. 

The next person to enter was Ihe 
bearded lady. On a closer look, as 
she paraded by, I noticed that here 
was another of my class mates, Reta 
Ice. I learned later that poor Reta, try- 
ing to fulfill her life's ambition to get 
married and so change the name Ice, 
which she detested, had at last given 
up hope of getting a man. She vowed 
revenge and became the only living 
lady in the world with a real beard. 

Then came the fat lady, and I do 
mean fat. In her short waddle around 
the ring, she knocked down three men, 
one tent post, and two horses! Was 
this really Marion Johnson? I remem- 
bered her nickname, "Fat", in high 
school, and decided it had at last gone 
to her head. 

As soon as the fat lady had wad- 
dled out of the ring, someone walked 
in completely covered with spiders and 
snakes. I immediately thought of my 
pal, Shirley Magdalenski, and her pho- 
bia for insects and snakes, and wished 
she were here with me. She couldn't 
even stand the sight of them. She used 
to draw pictures of them and then 
scream at the pictures — that's how 
bad it was. Now the snakes and spi- 
ders dropped to the ground at a sig- 
nal from their trainer. Then all went 
black, but when I recovered from my 
faint, the scene before me was still the 
same. It was Shirley! After the show 
she walked around the grounds with 
me, and while we were looking for 
more classmates, she told me I must 
be awfully stupid not to have known 
that she had the largest collection of 
snakes and bugs in the world and had 
risked her life in the perilous jungles 



THE TATTLER 



17 



to achieve such fame. She was earn- 
ing millions with those trained insects. 

Once outside the main tent, Shirley 
and I began our tour. "Let's have our 
fortunes told! There's a booth over 
there." Madame Gypsy Seemore La- 
Rosa met us inside the dark tent. Once 
accustomed to the dark, we recognized 
our Madame as Anne Gates. She told 
us that the reason for her guietness in 
school was that she had been studying 
and analyzing us, as she had had high 
hopes of becoming an honest fortune- 
teller. "What's more," she informed us, 
"I could have told you then that our 
class would eventually land in the cir- 
cus." 

It was now time for us to repair lip- 
stick in the powder room. From out- 
side we heard the sound of tap danc- 
ing. We opened the door and saw a 
large crow gathered around the ma- 
tron, or attendant. There in her blue 
uniform was Anna Mae Sincage doing 
one of her old tap routines. The dance 
soon ended and all the ladies tossed 
money to her. "You see," she said to 
us, "I'm the attendant for the powder 
room and I tap dance for the ladies 
to earn enough in tips to support my 
husband." 

We heard someone calling "Come 
see the Sheik; only one guarter of a 
dollar. The only living sheik now in- 
habiting our country." We paid our 
twenty-five cents and went inside. A 
servant took us into the harem and lo 
and behold, there was the sheik of our 
class, Philip Morin, surrounded by 
thirty of the most beautiful girls in the 
world. They were waiting on him 
hand and foot, and don't think he 
didn't look proud. He told us that he 
had played the leading role in several 
movies, one of them oriental, and so 
enjoyed having many beautiful wom- 
en to look at that he retired, buying 
all the women on the M.G.M. lot with 
a portion of his millions. 

There was Hawaiian music coming 
from 'the distance and following its 



sound we soon came upon a line of 
hoola-dancers. A rehearsal for the 
evening show was going on and to 
our utter amazement, Robert Sharpe 
was the instructor. What rhythm those 
gals had — Sharpie certainly taught 
them to dance well. "But," he said, 
"Wait a second and see my pride 
and joy." Out through the curtain 
came a big pile of bubbles. They 
flitted around the stage for a minute 
before I recognized the person under 
them. It was Joyce Morin! Sharpie 
boasted that one of his pupils, namely 
Joyce, was one of the most famous 
bubble dancers in both the inside and 
outside world. 

Shirley, still accompanying me, sup- 
posedly being a man-hater, had never 
been in a tunnel-of-love. Therefore, 
we started out to find one. We suc- 
ceeded and we also found another 
classmate, Charlie Warner, who had 
a reputation for having a girl on every 
corner. He was the sole owner of this 
tunnel of love. We rode through and 
he explained to us, "You'd be sur- 
prised how many different girls I meet 
this way. It's very unfortunate how 
many of their dates happen to 'fall' 
overboard." He had a device hooked 
up that dumped only the male of the 
species overboard. Shirley left to get 
ready for her next show. 

I had now seen almost all my class- 
mates and knew that Fate would see 
that I saw all of them before the day 
was over. My next stop was one of 
those circular halls where they have 
motorcycle races. On a big sign out 
front was an announcement — "Come in 
and see the fantastic, daredevil ride of 
Robert McCord." The motorcycle start- 
ed — a bugle played — and Bob started 
his famous ride to death. Around and 
around he went — higher and higher — 
up the wall — round and round, con- 
stantly climbing. Finally with the 
greatest speed ever witnessed by hu- 
man eye, he reached the top of the 
wall and then, up-side down, circled 
the ceiling — around and around. Then 
he cut the motor toward us, waved his 
hand, and said, "Nothin' to it. Got in 



18 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



practice going around in circles in 
school." I told him that I had seen 
everyone of our classmates and was 
very surprised that they were all liv- 
ing and working in one place. Then 
he informed me that since our class 
had always gotten along so well to- 
gether they decided to stay together 
in this inside world. Being fun lovers, 
they decided that a circus would be 
the best place for them. I told him I 



would be back in a few days to live 
with the graduates of Burgy High. 

So you see, here I am, back in the 
outside world. But I have my meager 
possessions together, have bidden fare- 
well to my past, and am on my way 
back to the cave, back to the circus, 
back to the underworld of the gradu- 
ates of Burgy High. 

ELAINE OUTHUSE 



Prophecy on we Prophele 



'ropnecy on 

Twenty years had now passed since 
graduation and I could never help 
pondering about the class of 1950. I 
hadn't seen any of them since that 
memorable June 22, but one person in 
particular kept coming to my mind, so I 
finally decided to visit her. I didn't 
know where she was or how to 
reach her, but it finally dawned on 
me that back in 1950 she was plan- 
ning to be an artist. So I began my 
search. 

I boarded a train headed for New 
York City and was at Grand Central 
in no time. After checking into a ho- 
tel, I took a cab to Greenwich Vil- 
lage, where I thought I might find 
Elaine. Sure enough, after three days 
of inquiring and probing I found 
Elaine's home, or should I say studio. 
Elaine naturally did not expect to see 
me and at first didn't recognize me as 
she opened the door. But it wasn't long 
before we were talking of old times 
and familiar places. As we talked my 
eyes wandered over the dark room. 



ropnetess 

Here and there were little wooden fig- 
ures of all kinds. A few oils were piled 
in the corner. 

"Well," I said, as I got up to leave, 
"I see you finally accomplished your 
ambition to become an artist." 

"Oh, yes," she answered sweetly, 
and added as she picked up a wooden 
figure, "aren't they cute?" 

"Yes," I stuttered. "What about 
them?" 

"This is my art, my profession," she 
exclaimed, with wide eyes and harsh 
voice. "I whittle. Here," she said, 
"take it," puting one of her odd wood- 
en masterpieces into my hand. 

I stammered my thanks and hastily 
departed, leaving behind my Bohemian 
friend. Later, in my hotel room, disap- 
pointed and disillusioned, I studied the 
wooden figure Elaine had given me, 
and wondered why I had ever decided 
to visit her. 



C/ass C/ rinds — C//r/< 



My half of the poem concerns the girls, 
Some have straight hair and others 

curls. 
This rhyme is not about a particular 

one, 
For you see this is just for fun. 

Lucy Barnas is the smallest in the 

class, 
Her home's up in Chesterfield, Mass. 
She comes to school daily on the bus, 
And you never here her making a fuss. 



For our next victim we take a lass, 
Who the boys say has plenty of class, 
She has blonde hair and says it's not 

dyed, 
But if you ask me, Joyce Colson lied. 

When Anne Gates came to Burgy this 

year, 
She brought along plenty of good 

cheer. 
When she leaves we'll be able to say, 
Certainly a good friend went away. 



THE TATTLER 



19 



We come to a girl with a real cold 

name, 
She hopes for good fortune and fame, 
It's none other than Reta Ice, 
Who'll end up being showered with 

rice. 

When she's old and maybe gray, 
People who know will always say, 
Marion Johnson from Haydenville, 

Mass., 
Was one of the best in the senior class. 

Shirley Magdalenski is the next one's 

name, 
Sometimes we wonder if she is sane, 
But she must be — she's so nifty, 
She was voted the Vamp of '50. 

From the Searsville hills comes Joyce 

Morin, 
Sometimes she regrets the day she was 

born. 
She's full of pep and a lot of fun, 
But she never has her homework done. 



Elaine Outhouse is victim number 

eight. 
Whenever we see her we know it's late. 
To be an artist is her one desire. 
In the field of art may she soar higher 

and higher. 

Her hair is red, her eyes are blue, 
Some say she's six feet two. 
By now I'm certain you must know, 
Of course I'm talking about Anne Sabo. 

Anna Mae's ambition is to be a wife, 
She hopes to be one the rest of her 

life. 
If she ever gets tired of it, you know, 
Home to mother she will go. 

Of our ten girls now I've told you. 
If you knew them you'd like them, too. 
Of the boys now you'll hear things nice 
So I'll turn you over to Reta Ice. 



Class Carinas *-* Boys 



My half of the poem concerns the boys 
A rhyme about each one. 
I'll try to tell you all their joys — 
This poem is just for fun. 

Baldwin hits the top of the list 
My helper in these grinds. 
What he needs is a psychiatrist. 
A joke he always finds. 

From the hills of Chesterfield 
Comes the guy with the long last name. 
Liimatainen, Dodgers, Ebbets Field, 
To us they're all the same. 

What's this, what's that, what can it 

be? 
Chickens and glads galore! 
Goodness gracious! It must be 

Macky — 
Success is his next door. 

Bob McCord is my next victim. 
He's handsome, that's a fact. 
All the girls just flock around him. 
M. G. M., where's his contract? 

Although Philip Morin misses the bus 

He's seldom late for class. 

Everyone knows he's a handsome 



cuss, 
Known for his play mustache. 

Earl Richardson is the quiet one 
In our small but well-known class. 
But nevertheless, he's full of fun 
For baseball leagues, he'll pass. 

"Chryslers and speed are just for me" 
That sounds about like Sharpe. 
But does he know St. Peter's fee 
Is nothing more than a harp? 

Allen Warner is the one now sought 
Who has his school days spent 
Trying to do wrong and not get 

caught. 
Why? He's the president! 

Last of all come the class twins, 

Charles and Henry Warner 

They seem to have the very same 

whims, 
A girl on every corner. 

Of our ten boys, now I've told you, 
In the class of 1950. 
If you knew them as we girls do 
You'd say, "They're pretty nifty." 

RETA ICE 



20 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



C/ass olalisfics 

Prettiest Girl Joyce Colson 

Handsomest Boy Charles Warner 

Most Popular Girl Joyce Morin 

Most Popular Boy Henry Warner 

Best Girl Dancer Anna Mae Sincage 

Best Boy Dancer Robert McCord 

Best Dressed Girl Anna Mae Sincage 

Best Dressed Boy Warren McAvoy 

Quietest Student Anne Gates 

Class Vamp Shirley Magdalenski 

Class Sheik Philip Morin 

Smartest Student Anne Sabo 

Best Girl Athlete Reta Ice 

Best Boy Athlete Earl Richardson 

Best Ail-Round Student Joyce Colson 

Man Hater Lucy Barnas 

Woman Hater Robert Liimatainen 

Student Most Likely to Succeed .... Allen Warner 

Class Wit Donald Baldwin 

Most Bashful Student .... . . Robert Sharpe 

Jolliest Student Shirley Magdalenski 

Most Business Like Marion Johnson 

Class Actress Shirley Magdalenski 

Class Actor Donald Baldwin 

Class Artist Elaine Outhuse 

oeniorscope 



ROBERT C. McCORD "Cordy" 

Ambition: Air Corps 

Pet Likes: Planes, fancy clothes, short girls 

Pet Dislike: Sophisticated Girls 

Weakness: Blondes 

Noted for: The Calvin on Sunday nights 

Favorite saying: I'll take you up on that! 

Favorite color: Blue 

Favorite song: "Mule Train" 

Favorite movie: "The Outlaw" 

WARREN O. McAVOY "Macky' 

Ambition: Raising flowers 

Pet Likes: Glads and Calla lilies. 

Pet Dislike: Getting up in the morning 

Weakness: Garden tractors 

Noted for: Driving 

Favorite saying: May I be excused? 

Favorite color: Yellow 

Favorite song: "Thou Swell" 

Favorite movie: "King Henry V" 

ANNE GATES 

Ambition: Home Economics Vocation 

Pet Likes: Collecting dogs and sewing 

Pet Dislike: School 

Weakness: Tall boys 

Noted for: Quietness 

Favorite saying: Oh, Nuts! 

Favorite color: Blue 

Favorite song: "Polonaise" 

Favorite movie: "Little Women" 

JOYCE MAXINE COLSON "Jo" 

Ambition: To have a happy marriage 
Pet Like: Earrings 
Pet Dislike: School 
Weakness: "Bill" Mason 



Noted for: Laugh 

Favorite saying: Wow! 

Favorite color: Green 

Favorite song: "Sitting by the Window" 

Favorite movie: "My Friend Irma" 

MARION JOHNSON "Fat' 

Ambition: To go ahead 
Pet Likes: Apple pie and bananas 
Pet Dislike: English Literature 
Weakness: Reading good books 
Noted for: Promptness 
Favorite saying: Oh, fudge! 
Favorite color: Blue 
Favorite song: "Polonaise" 
Favorite movie: "Hamlet" 

ROBERT LIIMATAINEN "Limmy' 

Ambition: To succeed in whatever I do 
Pet Likes: Fishing, hunting, and baseball 
Pet Dislike: People who hate these sports 
Weakness: Listening to Dodger games 
Noted for: Being a Dodger fan 
Favorite saying: "Oh Boy" 
Favorite color: Blue 
Favorite song: "Old Master Painter" 
Favorite movie: 1949 World Series 



SHIRLEY MAGDALENSKI 

Ambition: U. S. Wacs 

Pet Like: Dancing 

Pet Dislikes: Quiet people, men 

Weakness: Modern music 

Noted for: Hating men, acting silly 

Favorite saying: I can't stand it! 

Favorite color: Black 

Favorite song: "St. Louis Blues" 

Favorite movie: "Guadalcanal Diary' 



Margret' 



THE TATTLER 



21 



ELAINE OUTHUSE 

Ambition: To be happy 

Pet Likes: Vanilla cokes and Sat. nights 

Pet Dislikes: Lima beans, Tim Holt, braggarts 

Weakness: Normie, Snack Bar 

Noted for: Pin-up sketches 

Favorite saying: I love you, too 

Favorite color: Yellow 

Favorite song: "Prisoner of Love" 

Favorite movie: "My Foolish Heart" 

PHILIP V. MORIN "Fibber" 

Ambition: Physical education or U. S. Navy 
Pet Likes: Sports, pastries, nice clothes 
Pet Dislikes: Silly girls, stubborn people, 

English IV 
Weakness: Girls, money 
Noted for: Insulting people, teasing, being late 

for school 
Favorite saying: "Take off" 
Favorite color: Blue 
Favorite song: "When I Get You Alone 

Tonight" 
Favorite movie: "Battleground" 

EARL RICHARDSON 

Ambition: To travel and to play baseball 

Pet Like: Baseball 

Pet Dislike: Winter and liver 

Weakness: Movies 

Noted for: Arguing and playing baseball 

Favorite saying: "Christmas" 

Favorite color: Blue 

Favorite song: "Open Door, Open Arms" 

Favorite movie: "Pride of the Yankees' 



ROBERT SHARPE 

Ambition: Make a million 

Pet Like: Money 

Pet Dislike: School, especially English 

Weakness: Women 

Noted for: '42 Chrysler 

Favorite saying: Who me? 

Favorite color: Yellow 

Favorite song: "Ghost Riders" 

Favorite movie: "Sands of Iwo Jima" 

ANNA MAE SINCAGE 

Ambition: To get married 
Pet Like: Harvey 
Pet Dislike: English 
Weakness: Harvey 
Noted for: Talking about Harvey 
Favorite saying: Oh, No! 
Favorite color: Yellow 
Favorite song: "Again" 
Favorite movie: "Joan of Arc" 



Sharpie' 



"Birdie' 



"Pete' 



ALLEN WARNER 

Ambition: To be an M. D. 

Pet Likes: Biology and fried clams 

Pet Dislikes: Liver and English 

Weakness: Driving 

Noted for: Disagreeing with the rest of the 

Seniors 
Favorite saying: This is a class meeting, 

shut up! 
Favorite color: Blue 
Favorite song: "The Hills of Home" 
Favorite movie: "My Friend Flicka" 

CHARLES WARNER "Chuck" 

Ambition: One million dollars and a Cadillac 
convertible 



Pet like: Blondes 

Pet Dislike: Afternoon classes, pistachio 

Weakness: Women 

Noted for: Skipping classes 

Favorite saying: Wha' cha doing? 

Favorite color: Maroon 

Favorite song: "Always" 

Favorite movie: "Battleground" 

HENRY WARNER 

Ambition: Get Married 

Pet Like: Farming, horses 

Pet Dislike: School 

Weakness: Nancy 

Noted for: Devilish tricks 

Favorite saying: "Come on Baby-Doll" 

Favorite color: Blue 

Favorite song: "Ghost Riders in the Sky" 

Favorite movie: "Battleground" 

ANNE SABO 

Ambition: Happiness 

Pet Likes: People, expensive food 

Pet Dislikes: Liver, world history, dull people 

Weakness: Anything green 

Noted for: "Brown" hair, studying 

Favorite saying: "Well, you see, it's like this," 

Favorite color: Green 

Favorite song: Anything from bebop to Bach 

Favorite movie: "Gone With the Wind" 

RETA ICE "Veasel" 

Ambition: To be successful 

Pet Like: Having fun 

Pet Dislike: Washing dishes 

Weakness: Sword fish and strong vanilla coke 

Noted for: Sarcasm 

Favorite saying: I'm bored! 

Favorite color: Green 

Favorite song: "Dust" 

Favorite movie: "Battleground" 

LUCY BARNAS "Cookie" 

Ambition: To be happy 
Pet Likes: Swimming, movies 
Pet Dislike: School 
Weakness: Chicopee 
Noted for: Being quiet 
Favorite saying: Oh! 
Favorite color: Blue 
Favorite song: "Because" 
Favorite movie: "Battleground" 

DONALD BALDWIN "Ducky" 

Ambition: To go out West 

Pet Like: Chocolate Pie 

Pet Dislike: Shakespeare 

Weakness: Northampton 

Noted for: Oversleeping 

Favorite saying: Details, Details 

Favorite color: Blue 

Favorite song: "Home in Indiana" 

Favorite movie: "Going My Way" 

JOYCE MARY MORIN "Shorty" 

Ambition: Get Married 

Pet Like: "John" 

Pet Dislike: School 

Weakness: Raising Cain 

Noted for: Quick Temper 

Favorite saying: "Oh, I Know It!" 

Favorite color: Blue 

Favorite song: "Sentimental Me" 

Favorite movie: "Mrs. Mike" 



22 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




CLASS OF 1951 

Front row, left to right: Lucia Penfield, Marilyn Black, Elizabeth Hathaway, Ruth Bisbee, 
Jane Smith, Dorothy Brewer, Alice Curtis, Jean Ellen Harlow. 

Middle row, left to right: Joan Baldwin, Joan Bachand, Barbara Durbin, Marlene Shay, 
Murilyn Graves, Shirley Hathaway, Aaron Brown. 

Back row, left to right: Herbert Nye, Arthur Clary, Norman Tiley, Gilbert Sears, Burke Rye, 
James Magdalenski. 



C/5SS ofj 51 



Here we are in front of you, 
Hoping next year we will be through. 
We don't look studious or too smart, 
But Burgy High is just our start. 

Here we are — gaining knowledge, 
Which will carry us to college. 
Here our lives have just begun, 
This wonderful class of '51. 



JEANNE ELLEN HARLOW 



THE TATTLER 



23 




CLASS OF 1952 

Front row, left to right: Jeannine Bernier, Helen Baldwin, Joan Damon, John Warner, 
Richard Houghton, Richard Pierce, Nancy Bickford, Alyce Kwiecinski, Sylvia Nye. 

Middle row: left to right: Sally Adams, Janet Nichols, Janet Miller, Eileen O'Brien, Ruth 
McAvoy, Nancy Gates, Mary Graves, Gail Papineau, Lois Mollison. 

Back row, left to right: Robert Ames, Eugene Penfield, Harry Pomeroy, Bruce Purrington, 
David Kendall, Elson Hathaway, Edward Merritt, Wilbur Loomis. 



Oomed 



omeaay 



Someday when we're a little older, 
And some, perhaps, a little bolder, 
We will travel the rugged road, 
And share with others the heavy load. 

Someday we'll be in great demand, 
Someday, leaders of this fair land, 
And we'll be ready to meet the call, 
We'll stand firm — one and all. 

We'll meet the trials and pass the tests, 
Living justly — our happiness, 
We'll be steadfast, loyal, and true, 
We're the grand class of '52. 



NANCY BICKFORD 



24 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




CLASS OF 1953 

Front row, left to right: Barbara Derouin, Janice Richardson, Ramon Sears, Frank Smith, 
Sidney Nichols, Nancy Outhuse, Blanche Roberge, Patricia Evans. 

Middle row, left to right: William Hayden, Julia Kolosewicz, Karyl Ronka, Mary Jane Curtis, 
Jean Tiley, Ellen Jean Bancroft, Gordon Parker. 

Back row, left to right: Richard Purrington, Henry Bisbee, Paul Blanchard, David Heath, 
James Carson, Raymond Rice. 



Look my friends, 
And you will see, 
The Freshmen 
Class of '53. 

A lively group — 
Some thin, some fat, 
But all agree 
Some class at that! 

We never shirk 
At work or play 
So here's to us, 
We're on our way. 



JEAN TILEY 



THE TATTLER 



25 



<£it 



erar 



v 



Jhe Roaa Jrom Ul 



opia 



We individual Americans have al- 
ways held the key to prosperity in the 
palms of our hands. Individual enter- 
prise and economic solidarity have 
opened doors to success and happiness 
for the average American. As a nation, 
we are in a position to re-establish eco- 
nomic security and aid rehabilitation in 
other countries. Political and economic 
freedom have enabled us to envision 
America as a veritable Utopia, halted 
in its final step towards perfection by 
the absence of world peace and unity. 
But prosperity has blinded us to the 
fact that we reached a peak in eco- 
nomic freedom long ago, and that, to- 
day, we no longer are headed towards 
Utopia, but away from it. 

In our more or less constant struggle 
as a capitalistic nation versus socialis- 
tic Russia on a world-wide scale, we 
tend to ignore the conflict between so- 
cialism and capitalism within our own 
government. Perhaps we fear to rec- 
ognize the fact that socialism has made 
its conquests so easily within the past 
few years. Some of us acknowledge 
unwelcome changes in federal admin- 
istration but are loath to label them as 
socialism. It is time for us to face the 
facts and admit to ourselves that we 
are swiftly approaching the welfare 
state', basis of the socialist's sales talk 
and symbol of economic chaos. 

First of all, let's analyze the situation 
by outlining the ways in which we 
have veered from the straight and nar- 
row path of capitalism. Perhaps our 
biggest and most dangerous change 
has been in the growing power of our 
labor unions. In the beginning, the la- 
bor union was distinctly of benefit to 
the underprivileged worker, for he 
finally had a weapon with which to 
oppose management in the fight for 
better wages and better working con- 
ditions. But when the word of a single 



union official can paralyze essential in- 
dustries for a dangerous interval dur- 
ing a war, the power of the union has 
gone too far. John L. Lewis actually 
launched his United Mine Workers on 
such a strike in 1944, and it is doubtful 
whether or not he would have respect- 
ed the government order to go back 
to work even then if it had not been 
wartime. Such recent measures as the 
Taft-Hartley Bill that have been passed 
to limit and restrict the power of unions 
have actually been ignored. Isn't it 
about time for us to question the 
advisability of such power in the 
hands of non-government organiza- 
tions? Such power can ultimately re- 
sult only in the sky-high prices that ac- 
company high wages. It is also a boon 
to government bureaucrats, the fore- 
runners of irresponsible socialist ad- 
ministrators. 

The second danger sign that we 
should have noted was the tendency 
towards government control of indus- 
try under the New Deal. True, the or- 
ganizations of the New Deal were for 
the purpose of employing the unem- 
ployed and establishing economic 
stability, but after this was accom- 
plished, many of them stayed in ex- 
istence. Steps were even taken to put 
electrical power in the hands of the 
government when the much-disputed 
Tennessee Valley Authority was organ- 
ized. Great Britain is an actual illus- 
tration of conditions created by such 
government controls. There govern- 
ment monopolies of power, fuel, and 
transportation have resulted in a com- 
plete loss of individual enterprise, for 
no private businessman can operate 
without these essentials. Here again, 
such controls mean more government 
bureaus and the high taxes that are 
necessary to support the welfare state' 
administrators. 

The next time someone endorses so- 
cialized medicine or its counterparts in 
your presence, think of the 'welfare 



26 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



state' in its true light and remember 
that these little attempts at socialism 
are a beginning worth watching. They 
lead to more and bigger government 
controls and the taxation, high prices, 
inflation of currency, and general eco- 
nomic instability that accompany them. 
They can mean a loss of individual en- 
terprise for you, and that is a part of 
your heritage as an American citizen 
that should never be relinquished. The 
road to socialism is paved by govern- 
ment control, not individual liberty. 
That is why we must learn the lesson 
that Britain has taught us. We must 
build a strong and a more democratic 
America in hope that we may soon be 
able to find a detour on the road lead- 
ing from Utopia. 

ANNE SABO '50 

jHemoirs o$ a Baoy oitter 

The lot of the baby sitter is a hard 
one. To set with someone's oversized 
package of dynamite is no cinch. 

This is how it starts. The phone rings 
one night while you're sitting peace- 
fully in a chair, reading a torrid ro- 
mance. You say to yourself that you're 
glad that you don't have to baby- 
sit tonight. Alas! Your joy is short- 
lived. Your mother answers the phone. 
You hear her say, "Why of course, 
Mrs. Blank, I'm sure she'd just love to 
come over. Yes, I'll tell her. Goodbye. 
Oh by the way, did you ever hear 
about Jean's operation? You didn't? 
Well, I heard that yakety yakety 

yak . Well goodbye. I'll tell 

her you want her. Bye, now." Mother 
comes bouncing into the room and 
says, "Why aren't you ready to go to 
Mrs. Blank's? She wants you to be 
there at 8:00 and here it is, 7:45 al- 
ready. Why can't you learn to hurry?" 

Well, you finally arrive in time at 
the Blank's. On time, in fact, to put 
"little" Willie to bed. Mrs. Blank is still 
getting dressed at 8:30 and Mr. Blank 
is walking back and forth to the car 
from the house and wondering why 



the blankety-blank women can't dress 
faster. Finally she is ready to go, and 
so are you when "little" Willie sud- 
denly lashes out with his little hoof 
right into your shin. "Goodbye, Mrs. 
Blank, I'm sure he'll be no trouble at 
all." This last being choked out be- 
tween clenched teeth. 

The Blanks have finally gotten off 
and you have the house all to yourself 
and "little" six-year old Willie, and he 
is upstairs gagged and tied in bed 
where he'll do no harm. You settle 
down to your torrid romance which by 
this time is only partially warmed over. 
— Did you just hear a little pitter patter 
on the stairs? It was probably just your 
imagination, so you settle down again. 
— You begin to get nervous. There's 
that sound again. This time you see 
the door open slightly. Are your eyes 
deceiving you or is it really true. Yes, 
it is. It's Willie! You forgot that his 
father was the local Boy Scout leader 
and probably had taught him how to 
undo knots. Now what would you do 
to keep him quiet? A thought comes 
into your fiendish, warped brain, but 
you discard it. They might convict you 
of manslaughter. No, that wouldn't be 
any good. Why don't you just give up? 
You know you're licked. Oh well, you 
can't have your own way every time. 
You finally ask Willie what he wants 
and why he came downstairs. He tells 
you he wants something to eat, prefer- 
ably a pickle with a glass of milk, a 
dish of pistacio ice-cream, and a pea- 
nut butter sandwich. You start won- 
dering if he has a normal stomach or 
one of cast iron. After he's finished 
with this mess, you send him to bed. 
Five minutes later you go upstairs to 
see if he is sick yet, but this is the sight 

that greets your eyes: Willie is sound 
asleep with an "angelic" smile on his 
face. You begin to wonder. 

The Blanks arrive home. You eager- 
ly start wondering how much you're 
going to get. Mrs. Blank reaches into 
her purse for the money but can't seem 
to find anything but a ten-dollar bill. 
You feel like saying that that would 



THE TATTLER 



27 



do, but don't. Mr. Blank hasn't any 
change at all, so he says that he will 
pay you some other time. Oh no! Of 
course you don't mind! 

Anonymous 

All names and places in this story 
are fictitious and any similarity to per- 
sons living or dead is purely coinciden- 
tal. 

jhe Unifecl Steles Jhg — 
Symbol of aqualrty 

I sat on the grass and watched the 
flag by the grave-stone ripple a little in 
the breeze. I could not help but think 
of the other flags that were waving in 
the same breeze; some of them from 
the most ornate flagpoles that money 
can buy, some from old broom-handles, 
braced in tenement windows. I could 
see the hands that would lower them at 
sunset and lay them aside until another 
day; some would be well-kept, indif- 
ferent hands, others would be work- 
worn hands that would handle the 
brilliant colors lovingly. I could see the 
flags being put away; some in expen- 
sive leather cases, others on closet 
shelves under worn copies of the Bible. 

I looked at the flag and I knew that 
there was America. There, embodied 
in a piece of cloth, were the ideals of 
freedom and equality for which men 
live and die. There, before me, in this 
flag, was the destiny of millions of 
Americans, whether Christian or Com- 
munist, white or black, rich or poor. 
There was the dream of a few freedom- 
loving men materialized; a dream of a 
nation where all men were to be equal 
— equal, not in respect to riches and 
education, but equal in the possession 
of the riaht to pursue success and hap- 
piness. 

The annals of history will forever pre- 
serve the proof that a democracy sym- 
bolized by this flag can survive. Amer- 
ica has established the fact in the 
world that the ideals of democratic 



statesmen are stronger than the dia- 
bolical forces of hate and war. Under 
the protection of the flag, our rights to 
speak freely, worship in any manner 
we wish, and publicize our opinions 
have remained untouched by opposing 
forces in the rest of the world. It is evi- 
dent that we, as a nation, are strong 
because we, as citizens, are sheltered 
from the fears and distrusts that breed 
chaos. 

Yet, even as I looked at the flag and 
thought of the successes of the past 
that it symbolized, I could not help but 
think of the present also. I began to 
wonder how many Americans today 
take time to realize what their heritage 
of equality means to them. I thought 
of the confused turmoil that has been 
caused in our government and our 
homes by Communistic powers. Head- 
lines proclaiming another strike or an- 
other race-riot flashed before my eyes. 
Instead of attaining new standards of 
freedom and equality, it seemed that 
we were traveling in the other direc- 
tion, for here were new and bigger 
gaps between Communist and Ameri- 
can, capital and labor, white and 
black. 

I wondered if perhaps the change of 
environment for the average American 
who has deserted a farm for a factory 
job and a tenement room has not re- 
sulted in a complete change of ideals. 
Excess time for leisure and crowded liv- 
ing conditions have resulted in more 
complaints and discontent. Instead of 
making use of his gift of equality and 
free enterprise, the average American 
is depending more and more upon his 
leaders. And, most shameful fact of 
all, he is the man who supports the 
strikes, Anti-Semetic campaigns and 
race riots. I suddenly realized that the 
flag must wave rather sadly over the 
factory town, symbol of an equality 
that is slowly ceasing to exist. 

Then the future came into view in the 
form of, a huge question mark. Will the 



28 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



American people begin to realize their 
equality in time to preserve it in a cha- 
otic world? Will we awaken to the tact 
that it is our duty, in return for our free- 
doms, to guide our leaders in building 
a new, stronger democracy? This is our 
greatest crisis. We can so easily lose 
everything, or we can struggle to retain 
what we have. 

But I thought of the future and I be- 
came confident, for I was looking at the 
gravestone instead of the flag. I knew, 
at once, that there were too many 
Americans alive today who were will- 
ing to die for their country, as this sol- 
dier and his country-men did, to allow 
our ideals to disintegrate and our gov- 
ernment to perish. I knew that the rip- 
pling banner of stars and stripes would 
see us through this new problem, as it 
has done so often in the past. And I 
dreamed of a brighter tomorrow, when 
a more secure America will show the 
world that democracy is the way of 
life; when oppressed peoples will no 
longer be oppressed; and when a star- 
spangled flag will fly over a world of 
peace where all men are created equal 
in the eyes of men, as well as in the 
eyes of God. 

ANNE SABO '50 



J flu J-lome J 



own 



There are many different types of 
places in which to live. The business 
section of a city for instance, is one 
type, while the outskirts of the city is 
another. Then there is the country type 
and the type between country and city. 

In my opinion the ideal place in 
which to live is the last type between 
country and city. This is my home 
town. As far as looks are concerned, 
passers-by would call it a one-street 
town. But living here gives one a far 
better picture of it. There are many 
streets in this small town, each a little 
different from its neighbor. Each one 
presents a different type of beauty; 



each has different types of people. 
These streets are not just names as in 
a city; each one seems to have a per- 
sonality all its own. 

The people here are like one big 
family. They all know each other so 
well they might be father and son or 
mother and daughter. When there is 
a death on one street the whole town 
grieves with the family in which the 
death occurs; when someone is mar- 
ried everyone turns out for the wed- 
ding; when a family has a new arrival, 
the phone rings repeatedly with con- 
gratulations for the proud parents; 
when one of us needs help, the rest 
are eager to give it. 

Here everyone knows his neighbor 
as well as the person at the other end 
of town. Isn't this better than knowing 
only the people in your block as they 
do in the city? We're friendly people 
(or at least try to be). We greet each 
other on the street; we greet each other 
at church; we greet each other with 
cards or gifts at Christmas. We never 
walk by a person and wonder "Who is 
that." 

Another advantage our town has 
over the city is that we have our build- 
ings and our trees, too. In the city if 
one wants to enjoy nature he rides the 
subway to a "two-by-four" park. Here 
we find nature at every turn of the 
head. We have the clean fresh air and 
we guess the time of day by the sun. 
We have snow to shovel, grass to cut, 
and leaves to burn. And yet we have 
room for our school, our library, our 
church, our stores, gas stations, and 
post office. 

There are thousands of other little 
things that could be mentioned but 
these are the most important. These 
are my home town. 

-ELAINE OUTHUSE 



THE TATTLER 



29 



Jhe Depart 



ure 



You didn't have to take my hand 
The day you went away. 
You didn't have to smile at me 
In your happy shining way. 



You didn't even have to say 
The things that are usually said. 
Because I knew when the time had 

come 
Your path from pain soon would be 

led. 



You didn't have to do those things 

Because, you see, I knew 

That you were being called 

By persons much greater than you. 

Jean Ellen Harlow '51 



S 



prwg 



When winter is dying, and spring is 

nigh, 
When gray tints the snow, and blue 

tints the sky, 
Then gladly I bid cold winter good-by, 
And spring sends me greeting on a 

sweet warm sigh. 



She brushes the snow with her soft 

warm rays — 
Into the streams and into the bays, 
And on the fields her soft hand lays, 
To color the grass in just a few days. 



She calls back the birds, into the hills, 
And every brook with cool spring 

water fills, 
And after the last of the snow has run, 

she wills 
The flowers to rise, to breathe, to eat 

from the soil that she tills. 

But after fresh spring has done her 
work and left, 

Hot summer comes and begins his 
reign of theft, 



He drinks from the springs and crushes 
the flowers, with the heft 

Of his heat, and burns up the grass 
with fingers fiery and deft. 

fane Smith 

Jilumni Jioles 

Jane Smith 

OFFICERS OF W. H. S. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

President . . . Ruth Beebe Emrick 

Vice-President . . Lula Bisbee Smith 

Secretary . . Jean Everett Hemenway 

Treasurer .... Barbara Dymerski 

Executive Committee for two years: 
Margret Trainor, Richard Culver, 
Wendell Pittsinger, Hazel Damon 
Warner, Marjorie Page McKusick 

Executive Committee for one year: 
Robert Nash, Elizabeth Burke, Thom- 
as Barrus, George Munson, Dorothy 
Rhoades Colburn 

CLASS OF 1949 

Jeanette Baldwin — Working in Hart- 
ford 

Nancy Dunphy — Student at "Our Lady 
of Elms" 

Robert Durbin — Employed by the But- 
ler and Ullman Co. 

Irene Ferron — Employed by the Pro- 
phylactic Co. 

Dorothy Golash — Employed by the 
Prophylactic Co. 

Theresa LaCourse — A student nurse at 
the Saint Francis Hospital in Hart- 
ford 

Ann Leduc — A student nurse at Spring- 
field Hospital 

Esther Loomis — A student at North- 
ampton Commercial College 



30 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Ruth Merrit — A student nurse at Fitch- 
burg at the Burbank Hospital 

Alfred Papineau — Employed at the 
Berkshire Etching Co. 

Lorraine Richardson — A Wac at Camp 
Lee, Virginia 

Arlene Sears — Married 

Doris Shumway — A student nurse at 
the East Hartford Hospital 

Mary Sroczek — Employed as a house- 
keeper in Florence 

Howard Tiley — In the lumber business 

Frank Vaillancourt — Employed as a 
tree surgeon 

MARRIAGES DURING *49-'50 



Chester Letner 

to Barbara Ann Cone 

Gordon Himmelman 
to Lorraine E. Jones 

James F. McAllister Jr. 
to Mary E. Kenny 

Victor A. Brinn 

to Theodora H. Harlow 

Burton H. Linscott 
to Harriet I. Ice 

Leon A. Parsons Jr. 
to Laura R. Lloyd 

William G. Connell 
to Mary J. Bowker 

Henry J. Kopka 

to Patricia Purseglove 

Howard Tiley 

to June Demerski 

Albert H. Cullen 
to Elizabeth Kulash 

Harry Warner Jr. 
to Esther Billings 

Rene A. Desmarais 
to Beverly Constantine 

Donald Wickland 
to Margaret Webster 

Robert T. Wilson 
to Palma Ingellis 



'45 

'45 
'44 

'47 

'47 

'48 

'43 
'41 

'49 
'48 

'46 
'42 

'44 

'43 

'48 



Donald Tirrell 
to Arlene Sears 

DEATHS 

Marion Damon Sylvester 

BIRTHS 



'49 



'09 



Name Year Graduated 

Son to Geneva Graves Warner '43 

Son to Betty Lou Harlow Sylvester '43 

Son to Hans L. Nietsche '35 

Son to "Buddy" Roberge '41 

Daughter to Catherine Vining Doyle '35 

Daughter to Janice Wells Banister '39 

Son to Marion Sylvester Holman '44 

Son to Lorraine Jones Himmelman '45 

Son to Lena Batura '42 

Daughter to Jean Crone Hogencamp 

'43 

Son to Shirley Campbell Hathaway '40 

Son to Lois Bisbee Gillman '32 

Son to Vernon West '37 

Son to Agnes Matrishon Cone '44 

Son to Marguerite Sabo Webb '36 
and Otis Webb '35 

Son to Donna Hobbs Damon '44 

and Neil Damon '45 

Son to Eva Sanderson Adkins '45 

Daughter to Rowena Pittsinger Russell 

'33 

Son to Edwin W. Russell '35 

Daughter to Anna Baj Meehan '34 

Daughter to Richard J. Culver '41 

Son to Raymond Bradford '35 

and Viola Mason '34 

Son to Lena Niewiadomski McCarthy 

'35 

Son to Lillian Blanchard Green '37 

Daughter to Ruth Black Koczela '38 

Son to Charles J. Watling '24 



THE TATTLER 



31 




"TATTLER" 

Front row, left to right: Faculty Advisor, Mrs. Grinnell; Anna Mae Sincage, Elaine Outhuse, 
Murilyn Graves, Reta Ice, Anne Sabo; Faculty Advisor, Miss Lovechio. 

Back row, left to right: Jean Ellen Harlow, Edward Merritt, Robert Liimatainen, Warren 
McAvoy, Allen Warner, Jane Smith, Philip Morin, Marion Johnson. 




"ATOMIC" STAFF 

Front row, left to right: Jean Ellen Harlow, Mrs. Grinnell, Frank Smith, Dorothy Brewer, 
Joyce Morin, Philip Morin, Anna Mae Sincage, Marion Johnson. 

Middle row, left to right: Joyce Colson, Elaine Outhuse, Ruth Bisbee, Reta Ice, Ruth McAvoy, 
Marilyn Balck, Nancy Outhuse, Joan Damon, Shirley Magdalenski. 

Back row, left to right: Donald Baldwin, Anne Sabo, Charles Warner, Murilyn Graves, 
Paul Blanchard, Allen Warner, Bruce Purrington, Jane Smith, Henry Warner. 



32 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




FORENSIC LEAGUE 

Front row, left to right: Jean Ellen Harlow, Dorothy Brewer, Miss Lovechio, Sally Adams, 

Karyl Ronka. 
Back row, left to right: Arthur Clary, Jane Smith, Anne Sabo, Murilyn Graves, Ruth Bisbee. 



Jorensic 



The debating season began this year 
on November 22, 1949, when represent- 
atives from Williamsburg attended and 
participated in the practice tournament 
held at Westfield. 

Under the supervision and coaching 
of Miss Maria Lovechio, The Forensic 
Club witnessed both an enjoyable and 
successful year, for up until the last 
debate of the year, Williamsburg was 
tied for first place honors with North- 
ampton. The two teams met for their 
second debate on Wednesday, March 
1, at which time the home team, nega- 
tive, went down to defeat by a decision 
of 2 to 1. This brought the total number 
of Williamsburg's wins to 6 and losses 
to 2 while Northampton suffered its 
only defeat at the hands of our affirm- 
ative representatives, Jane Smith and 
Dorothy Brewer. The negative side of 



the resolution, Resolved that the presi- 
dent of the U. S. should be elected by a 
direct vote of the people, was upheld 
throughout the year by Jeanne Ellen 
Harlow and Anne Sabo. 

In addition to debating, members of 
the Forensic Club also prepared dec- 
lamations which were given at a school 
assembly, Grange, Goshen Women's 
Club, and various other organizations. 
Four members: Sally Adams, Murilyn 
Graves, Anne Sabo, and Jane Smith 
traveled to Amherst April 1 to attend 
the Model Congress. 

Of those who were active in debat- 
ing this year, Anne Sabo earned 
enough points to be awarded the de- 
gree of distinction and Jane Smith and 
Dorothy Brewer obtained the degree of 
honor. 



THE TATTLER 



33 




ORCHESTRA 

Front row, left to right: Jane Smith, Murilyn Graves, Sondra Black, Sylvia Nye, Nancy 

Gates, Joan Culver. 
Back row, left to right: Edward Merritt, Elson Hathaway, Ruth McAvoy, David Heath. 




GLEE CLUB 

Front row, left to right: Sylvia Nye, Reta Ice, Alice Curtis, Marion Johnson, Anna Mae 
Sincage, Joyce Morin, Alyce Kwiecinski, Joan Baldwin. 

Middle row, left to right: Jean Ellen Harlow, Elaine Outhuse, Julia Kolosewicz, Anne Gates, 
Murilyn Graves, Anne Sabo, Shirley Hathaway, Shirley Magdalenski, Gail Papineau. 

Back row, left to right: Burke Ray, Warren McAvoy, Richard Houghton, Bruce Purrington, 
Edward Merritt, Herbert Nye. 



34 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




CHORUS 

Front row, left to right: Herbert Nye, Elson Hathaway, Henry Bisbee, Edward Merritt, 
Robert Ames, David Heath, Robert Liimatainen, Frank Smith. 

Second row, left to right: Blanche Roberge, Reta Ice, Lucia Penfield, Sylvia Nye, Joan 
Damon, Alice Curtis, Marion Johnson, Anna Mae Sincage, Joyce Morin, Ellen Jean 
Bancroft, Alyce Kwiecinski, Joan Baldwin, Shirley Magdalenski. 

Third row, left to right: Joan Ellen Harlow, Elaine Outhuse, Karyl Ronka, Patricia Evans, 
Julia Kolosewicz, Ruth Bisbee, Anne Gates, Joan Bachand, Nancy Gates, Janet Miller, 
Janet Nichols, Gail Papineau, Lois Mollison. 

Fourth row, left to right: Jean Tiley, Anne Sabo, Murilyn Graves, Jane Smith, Warren 
McAvoy, Richard Houghton, Bruce Purrington, Nancy Outhuse, Ruth McAvoy, Mary 
Jane Curtis, Nancy Bickford. 



CtUerybody s C/ effing J I tarried 



On March 1 1 of this year a large and expectant group waited in the 
Town Hall for the curtain to rise on the first performance of "Everybody's 
Getting Married." The actors in the comedy were members of the senior 
class of '50 and the director was Mr. Leo Parent. Immediately the audience 
warmed to the plight of Reginald D'Arcy, portrayed excellently by Allen 
Warner, who was willed an inheritance of one million dollars by his aunt on 
the condition that within a month he would bring his aunt's business to a close 
by finding husbands for six women who were clients of the T. C. S. C. 
The will presented a further complication in that it forbade Reginald to marry, 
unless to one of these women, until husbands had been found for all the 
women. 

This plan did not suit Viola Compton, played by Anne Sabo, his fiancee, 
who promptly returned his ring, but Dean Garret, the role enacted by Charles 



THE TATTLER 



35 




PRO MERITO 

Front row, left to right: Lucia Penfield, Elaine Outhuse, Marion Johnson, Murilyn Graves. 
Back row, left to right: Elizabeth Hathaway, Allen Warner, Anne Sabo, Gilbert Sears, 
Jane Smith. 



Warner, a man about town, agreed to help Reginald out of his confusing sit- 
uation for a small commission, only $30,000. 

The roles of James, the valet, and Miss Effie Cramer, spinster, comically 
played by Donald Baldwin and Shirley Magdalenski provided the audience 
with many an occasion for laughter, especially when James was being per- 
sistently pursued by Miss Cramer. 

Philip Morin gave an excellent performance as the lawyer who finally 
succumbs to the charms of Dulcey Lane., the show girl played by Anna Mae 
Sincage. 

The other potential wives were played by Elaine Outhuse, Marion John- 
son, Joyce Morin, Reta Ice; their would-be husbands were Warren McAvoy, 
Robert Liimatainen, and Henry Warner. 

When the curtain fell, we had seven married couples, a very pleased and 
enthusiastic audience, and a successful senior class play. 



36 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




BOYS' BASKETBALL 

Front row, left to right: Earl Richardson, Frank Smith, Captain Philip Morin, Gilbert Sears, 

Ramon Sears. 
Back row, left to right: Elson Hathaway, Harry Pomeroy, Mr. Tonet, James Johnson, 

Eugene Penfield. 




CHEERLEADERS 

Front row, left to right: Reta Ice, Anna Mae Sincage, Joan Culver. 

Back row, left to right: Alyce Kwiecinski, Sylvia Nye, Captain Jean Ellen Harlow, 
Lucia Penfield. 



THE TATTLER 



37 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL 

Front row, left to right: Marlene Shay, Joan Damon, Joan Bachand, Joan Culver, Joan 

Baldwin, Alyce Kwiecinski. 
Back row, left to right: Karyl Ronka, Mary Graves, Nancy Outhuse, Eileen O'Brien, 

Sylvia Nye. 



C//V/S Basketball 



Twelve girls of Williamsburg High formed a basketball team this year 
under the skillful directing and coaching of Miss Margaret Trainor and "Ted" 
Ames. The season resulted in few wins but the time devoted to practice was 
profitably spent, for the girls are now well trained in the fundamental arts of 
basketball. Bright new green gym suits provided an added incentive to the 
players as they won their last game of the season against Sanderson with 
the score of 11 to 10. Future games, in future years, will no doubt give the 
girls an opportunity to prove their ability as basketball players and enthusiasm 
as a team. 



TEAMS PLAYED SCORE 

Opponent Williamsburg 

Powers 37 22 

Sanderson 29 10 

Huntington 38 30 

Powers 33 16 

Sanderson 10 11 



^Autographs 



SIGNPOST OF YOUR FUTURE 



'^M^tT ^m.*s-K- 



' 



■- 



i.Xtl* 



AMERICAN 
INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE 




GOING TO COLLEGE? 

The country and the community need college trained men and women to 

lead the coming generations. At 

AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE 

YOU ARE OFFERED . . . 

1. A well-rounded, educational institution, established in 1885, with a present 
enrollment of more than 1300 full-time students. American International 
College is co-educational and non-sectarian. It is one of the most rapidly 
growing institutions of higher learning in New England. 

2. A chance to continue your education among former friends and class- 
mates. 

3. A college recognized by the American Council on Education and the 
American Medical Association. 

4. The home of the Model Congress — a popular feature which annually 
attracts high school students from all over New England. 

5. The opportunity to get your degree while living at home. The amount 
saved can be applied toward graduate work or for starting in a business. 

6. A good chance for a scholarship. Some high ranking students will be 
awarded scholarships if recommended by their principals. 

7. No quota system. 



THE WILLIAMS HOUSE 

and the 

Petticoat Hill Tavern Room 

(Redecorated and Replanned) 



Enjoy the hill country, the game country, the outdoor sport country 
— The Berkshire Hills! After your trip, before it, and while you visit 
here — stop at the old Williams House — where you will find the new 
replanned rooms and service among the most enjoyable in the 
region. 



Fine Food — Choice Beverages 

Dancing Friday and Saturday 
Weddings — Parties — Banquets 

THE WILLIAMS HOUSE 

Williamsburg 4141 

On the Berkshire Trail 



Complete Tree and Landscaping Service 



Baltzer Tree Service 



* * * 



TEL. 44-W 



261 King St. Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 



SMITH'S PACKAGE STORE 



CHILSON'S SHOPS 

W. LEROY CHILSON 

Furniture Coverings and Upholstery Supplies 

Awnings — ■ Venetian Blinds — Combination Storm Windows and Screens 

Furniture Upholstering — Window Shades 

Automobile Plate & Safety Glass — Truck Covers & Canvas Goods 

Slip Covers — Cushions — Auto Tops and Upholstery 

34 Center Street Northampton 



Compliments of 

C. F. Jenkins 

* * * 

ICE CREAM 
STATIONERY — GREETING CARDS — MEDICINES 



The Snack Bar 

LASALLE'S ICE CREAM — FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

* * * 

LES. TAYLOR, Prop. 
WILLIAMSBURG 



Compliments of 


Allwood Products Co. 


* * * 


WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


A FRIEND 


A FRIEND 


EGESTA FARM 


Compliments of 


STRAWBERRIES 


J. M. HOWES 


For That Last Shortcake Call 




LEW BLACK — WHS Class '23 


GENERAL MERCHANDISE 


Tel. Williamsburg 3566 


Swift River 



PLEASANT TIME SHOP 

WATCHES RINGS DIAMONDS 

EXPERT WATCH REPAIRING 
83 Pleasant Street 



Northampton 



MANHAN 
POTATO CHIP CO., Inc. 

NORMA LEE CANDIES 
92 King St. Tel. 771 Northampton 



Congratulations and continual success in 
the future. This is the wish of the leading 
men's and boys' wearing apparel store 
in Northampton. 

HARRY DANIELS 
ASSOCIATES 



WARD MILLER 

Westinghouse and Norge Refrigerators 

York Boiler Burner Units 

Oil Burners <S Service 

HOME INSULATION 

14 Center St., Northampton Tel. 2123-R 



Compliments of 

KING'S 
PAINT <£ PAPER STORE 



157 Main Street 



Northampton 



RUBY'S 
FURNITURE STORES, Inc. 



Northampton's Largest and Most Beautiful Store 



15 Bridge Street, Northampton 



Tel. 3519 



Compliments of 



CWVc(2affum^ 



150-154 Main Street 



Northampton 



O. T, DEWHURST 

OPTOMETRISTS and OPTICIANS 

Our modern school systems put a lot of work upon growing eyes 
which puts a strain upon those with defective vision. Latent 
defects in the eyes of children should be carefully looked after. 
A little foresight now may help them in their studies. Let us 
examine their eyes. 



201 Main St. 



Tel. 184-W 



Northampton 



Compliments ot 

PACKARD - NORTHAMPTON, Inc. 



141 King Street 



Tel. 4360-W 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



G. J. MORRISON 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 

163 Main — Opposite McCallum's 

Northampton's Optician 



For the young fellow who graduates this 

year we have everything that he needs 

for this important occasion. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO. 

NORTHAMPTON 



Stop at the 


■ 




Compliments of 


MODEL BAKERY 


HERLIHY'S STORE 


FOR TASTY PASTRY 






76 Maple St. Florence 


82 Maple St. Florence, Mass. 




Compliments of 


Compliments of 


BREGUET'S SERVICE 


CARL'S APPAREL SHOP 


STATION 






11 No. Maple St. Florence 


FLORENCE. MASS. 




PADDOCK'S 


LONGTIN'S 


CLEANERS and TAILORS 


FLORENCE STORE 


Suits Made to Order 


90 Maple St. 


$47.50 and Up 


Men's and Boys' Clothing 


FLORENCE, MASS. 


Furnishings — Footwear 


Compliments of 


MURDUFF'S JEWELRY STORE 


139 Main Street Florence, Mass. 


Diamonds — Watches — lewelry 


Watch Repairing 



Compliments of 



PACKARD'S SODA SHOPPE 



Compliments of 

HASKELL & GILBERT OFFICE SUPPLY, Inc. 

SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT 
247 Main Street, Northampton Tel. 672 



Compliments of 



DR. M. M. DUNPHY 



COLONIAL CLEANERS 

QUALITY CLEANING — DYEING 
WEEKLY PICK-UP — DELIVERY SERVICE 
Carly Sylvester & Harrison A. Fisher 
4 Main Street Tel. 247 Williamsburg 



Compliments of 

TREMBLAY DRUG CO. 

The REXALL STORE 

M. L. Sender, Ph. G., Reg. Ph., Prop. 

131 Main Street Florence, Mass. 



Compliments of 



COHEN BROS. 



Easthampton 



Northampton 



Compliments 0/ 

ROBERT NEWELL CLASS OF '41 

SOCONY STATION 
Across From Dickinson Hospital 


Compliments of 

MACDONALD'S SHOE SHOP 

185 Main Street Northampton 


CERRUTI'S 

JEWELERS — ENGRAVERS 

WATCHMAKERS 

Northampton 


BERKSHIRE ETCHING 
CORPORATION 

MANUFACTURERS OF NAMEPLATES 


ARTISTS' SUPPLIES 
PAINTS — WALLPAPER — GLASS 

PIERCE'S PAINT STORE 

196 Main St. Northampton 


Congratulations to the Graduates 

FINES ARMY NAVY STORE 

37 Main St. Northampton 


Compliments of 

THE BEE HIVE STORE 

SHOES — CLOTHING — FURNISHINGS 
29 Main Street Northampton 



GO TO BRANDLE'S FIRST 

To Save Time and Trouble for Your 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

Main Street Northampton 

Compliments of 

HATHAWAY & CULVER 

LUMBER 
Tel. 219 Williamsburg, Mass. 



Headquarters for Everything Electric 

SALES AND SERVICE 

Nothing Too Small or Too Large 

All Work Done by Experts 

We Repair All Radios and Electrical Appliances 

Parsons Electric Shop 

28 Center Street Northampton, Mass. Phone 1307 

Electrical Contracting Since 1900 



Compliments of 

THE CEDAR CHEST 

177 Main St. Northampton 


Compliments of 

LYNCH SHOP 

SPORTSWEAR TEEN-AGE DRESSES 
NORTHAMPTON 


Compliments of 

CARLSON'S 

NORTHAMPTON 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


Compliments of 

NORTHAMPTON SPORTING 
GOODS CO. 

161 Main St. Phone 715 


ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 

PURSEGLOVE'S 

15 State Street Northampton 


Compliments of 

R. A. MacLEOD NURSERY 

LANDSCAPING AND TREE SERVICE 

Williamsburg 

Telephone 211 Old Goshen Road 



Compliments of 



Noble Manufacturing 
Company, Inc. 



Compliments of 

FOSTER FARRAR CO. 



162 Main Street 



Tel. 11 



Compliments of 



DAILY HAMPSHIRE 



GAZETTE 



Compliments of 



THE BOOTERY 



Northampton, Mass. 



BISBEE BROTHERS 

Get Our Prices on Everything You Need 
Tel. Williamsburg 271 and Chesterfield 2145 


DR. CHARLES C. STARK, JR. 

OPTOMETRIST 

TEL. 766-W 

Monday Evenings by Appointment 

Hours: 9 to 1 — 2 to 5:30 

110 Main Street Northampton, Mass. 


Compliments of 

BEAVER BROOK POULTRY 
FARM 

LEEDS, MASS. 


Compliments and Best Wishes to the 
CLASS OF 1950 

JACK AUGUST 

NORTHAMPTON 


Compliments of 

THE RAINBOW CLUB, Inc. 

HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 


Compliments of 

W. E. KELLOGG and SON 

DAIRY and POULTRY PRODUCTS 
Tel. 3631 Williamsburg 



Compliments of 


HERBS AND ANNUALS 




CHOICE PERENNIALS 


JONES THE FLORIST 


For Rock Garden and Border 




HOUSE PLANTS 


HAYDENVILLE 


VILLAGE HILL NURSERY 


TEL. 4331 - 4332 


WILLIAMSBURG 


Compliments of 


SOCONY SERVICE STATION 




DIAL 275 


MORRIS CLARK 


WILLIAMSBURG 


WAR BONDS 






Compliments of 


AND STAMPS 






R. F. BURKE 


WILLIAMSBURG 






WILLIAMSBURG 


POST OFFICE 




EGGS, POULTRY — BABY CHIX 


BEEBE'S LUNCH 


Williamsburg 4831 


A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 


UPLAND FARM 


Ice Cream and Beverages 


On Village Hill 


Berkshire Trail Haydenville 


Albert, Dorothy & Peter Crone 


A. T. BEEBE, Prop. 



Tel. 2200 



Compliments o/ 

SUNSHINE FEED STORE 

King Street, Northampton 
"A Wayne Feed for Every Need" 



Compliments of 

NORTHAMPTON 
RADIATOR WORKS 

JOHN G. MONGEAU 
346 King St. Tel. 2204-W 



Compliments of 

WHALEN'S 
Fat Mike Joe 

341 King St. Northampton 



Compliments of 

CALLHANS 
5 & 10 STORE 



81 Main St. 



Florence 



Compliments of 

ANN AUGUST 
& COMPANY 



Compliments of 

BASILE ELECTRIC 



RADIOS and APPLIANCE 



180 Main Street 



Tel. 3806 



Compliments of 

FORREST CLARY 

NATIVE LUMBER — CUSTOM SAWING 



Tel. 3092 



Williamsburg 



Compliments of 

MORIARTY DRUG 

PRESCRIPTION DRUG STORE 

JOHN F. MORIARTY, Reg. Pharmacist 

Florence, Massachusetts 



Compliments of 

FRANCIS L. LAMONTAGNE 

PAINT —WALLPAPER 

HOBBY — SUPPLIES 

12 North Maple St. Florence, Mass. 



Compliments of 

MUTTER MOTOR 
SALES, Inc. 

NEW & USED CARS 

of Many Makes 

84 Conz St. Tel. 3382 



Compliments of 

NORTHAMPTON 
AUTO PARTS 

Dealer In 

SCRAP IRON and METALS 

USED AUTO PARTS 

S. R. Shermata King St. 



Compliments of 



HAMPSHIRE MOTOR SALES 



286 North King Street 



Northampton, Mass. 



HAYDENVILLE BUTTON COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

Manufacturers of 

PEARL BUTTONS AND NOVELTIES 

HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 


HICKEY'S ICE CREAM BAR 

Bridge St. Haydenville 

Cigarettes — Magazines 

Cigars — Newspapers 

La Salle's Ice Cream 


Compliments of 

MORIN'S BARBER SHOP 

HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 


Compliments of 

J. R. MANSFIELD & SON 

FUNERAL HOME 
South Main Street Haydenville 


j. f. McAllister 

ESSO SERVICENTER 

Gasolines — Motor Oil — Tires 

Route 9 Haydenville 

Batteries — Accessories 


Compliments of 

CHUCK'S RADIO SHOP 

HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 


Compliments of 

O'BRIEN'S PAINT SHOP 

HAYDENVILLE 





Compliments of 



Northampton Street 
Railway Company 

EDWARD A. PELLISSIER 

Vice Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 

Serving Williamsburg 



Compliments of 



GUSETTI'S 



* • * 



Compliments of 



REARDON BROS. 



HAYDENVILLE 



Compliments of 



THE HAYDENVILLE COMPANY 



Compliments of 

The 
WILLIAMSBURG BLACKSMITHS 



Compliments of 



THE LUNCH BOX 



Compliments of 

THE CLARY FARM 

For Farm and Village Property Consult 

SILAS SNOW 

Tel. 3563 Williamsburg 



Compliments of 

SYMONS PLUMBING CO. 



PLUMBING 



HEATING 



Herman A. Cohen 



Phone 1426 



THE FAIR STORE 



WOMEN'S - MEN'S and CHILDREN'S WEAR 



SHOES 



27-29 Pleasant Street 



Northampton 



FOR QUALITY FLOWERS 



BUTLER & ULLMAN, Inc. 



NORTHAMPTON 



Phone 200 



Phone 200 



E. J. GARE & SON 

JEWELERS 

WATCHES DIAMONDS 

Established 1785 

112 Main Street Northampton 



Compliments of 

HILLCREST 
POULTRY FARM 



Compliments of 


Compliments of 


H. D. STANTON 


S. A. HEALY AND SONS 


GENERAL MERCHANDISE 






West Chesterfield 


West Chesterfield Telephone 2523 




PURE MAPLE SYRUP 




Made by 


Compliments of 


REINO LIIMATAINEN 




By the Gorge 


A FRIEND 


West Chesterfield, Mass. 




SNYDER'S EXPRESS 


TRUCKING and EXCAVATING 


Worthington, Massachusetts 


Compliments ol 


New England Printing Co. 


INCORPORATED 


Rear 20 Arnold St. Westfield, Mass. 



Best Wishes to 



CLASS OF '50 



WILLIAMSBURG FUEL & ICE COMPANY 



W. E. & W. O. McAvoy 

GROWERS OF GLADIOLUS OF DISTINCTION 

The Number One Flower of the Age 

CORMS and CUT FLOWERS IN SEASON 

Visitors Welcome 



98 South Street 



Tel. 4663 



Box 150 



Williamsburg, Mass. 
We Deliver 



COUNTRY MARKET 

R. WATLING, Prop 

MEATS — GROCERIES 

Haydenville, Mass. 



WM. BAKER & SON 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



Service — Courtesy — Satisfaction 



Telephone 2341 



Chesterfield 



EXPERT RADIO REPAIR 
PROMPT SERVICE 

FRANCIS DRESSER JR. 

Goshen, Mass. Tel. Williamsburg 4895 


Compliments of 

GEORGE L. BARRUS 
& SONS 

GENERAL FARMING 
WOOD LUMBER MAPLE PRODUCTS 

Goshen, Mass. 
Tel. Williamsburg 3862 or 3866 




Compliments of 

LINCHOLN HOWES 

Representative 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Cummington, Mass. 


Compliments of 

PIERCE'S STORE 

Goshen, Mass. 

FINE MEATS - FROZEN FOODS 

GROCERIES 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 




Compliments of 

BROOK'S GARAGE 


All Kinds of 

ROUGH and FINISHED LUMBER 

LATHE DOWELS BANDSAWING 

PACKARD BROTHERS 

Goshen Tel. Williamsburg 4073 




Compliments of 

TYE SWIFT RIVER LODGE 

CABINS — LUNCHES 
SWIFT RIVER 

| = 


Compliments of 

THAYER'S EXPRESS 





Compliments of 

I W. PATSONS & SON, Inc. 

REFRIGERATION SPRAYERS TRACTORS 

FARM MACHINES and SUPPLIES 



Tel. 2885 



75 North King Street 



NORTHAMPTON 




* 

SEE OUR SELECTION OF 
GOOD — DENPENDABLE 

USED CARS 



Northampton 
BUICKCO. 



Compliments of 

WILLIAMSBURG 
GENERAL STORE 

MEATS - GROCERIES - DRY GOODS 

GAS & ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 

SHOES - BOTTLED GAS 

Phone 294 Williamsburg 



Compliments of 

FLORENCE AUTO CLINIC 

PRACTICAL AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 

QUALITY USED CARS 
E. Filkins F. A. Bouley 

Tel. 428-W Florence 



WOOD & STRAND 

JEWELERS 

Northampton 

WATCHES 



Elgin 

Bulova 

Longines 



Hamilton 

Whittnauer 

Omega 



DIVIDED PAYMENTS 



Compliments of 



F. N. GRAVES & SON 



WILLIAMSBURG